Location Guides > 6 Things to Do For Elderly People in Manchester

6 Things to Do For Elderly People in Manchester

Manchester is a huge city in the North-West of England, with a rich history dating back over a thousand years. Unsurprisingly, there are therefore a huge variety of things for elderly people to do in this bustling city, from shopping and art to libraries, museums and much more! Read on to find out our top 7 picks for elderly people to enjoy in Manchester.

John Rylands Library

Where better to start than the fantastic John Rylands library, set in a beautiful Grade I listed building that was first opened to the public in 1900. This neo-Gothic masterpiece houses a wide range of historical collections, including a Gutenberg Bible, mediaeval manuscripts and many more ancient texts.

Conveniently located in the heart of the city, it is easily accessible by road, train, tram and foot. The library is highly accessible, with lifts, ramps and handrails in place to ensure that all ages are able to visit. Entry is free and you should be able to take it all in within an hour, from the Historic Reading Room to numerous events and exhibitions which are on place throughout the year.

Find out more by visiting their website here.

Trafford Centre

If you fancy getting something to eat or doing a bit of shopping, the Trafford Centre is a famous and entertaining shopping and leisure destination which is full of clothing stores, delicious food and leisure activities. In fact, it’s the third-largest shopping centre in the UK, with over 35 million annual visitors!

Events change throughout the year and you can go to live music, theatres and musicals, food experiences and more. Find out what is on here.

Wheelchairs and other mobility options can be hired from the main customer services desk, and there is disabled parking for your convenience.

The excellent Manchester Art Gallery has been displaying art since 1823 and currently has a collection of around 25,000 objects. It is free to visit and is open every day of the week, with over 500,000 annual visitors!

You can view which of the diverse range of exhibitions and events are currently on show here, but throughout the year you’ll be able to view the Gallery’s collection of historical artefacts and artworks, as well as international contemporary pieces of art. The Gallery is famous for its collection of 19th-century British artworks, including Pre-Raphaelite art. You can spend hours viewing the paintings, as well as silver, glass and ceramic objects and other types of beautiful art.

Lift access ensures you can reach all parts of the gallery and there is a cafe serving hot and cold food, as well as cakes.

Manchester Cathedral

Next up on our list is the impressive Manchester Cathedral. The Cathedral you see today traces its origins back to the 15th century, but there has been extensive restoration and extensions made since, including to repair damage caused during World War II. It remains a fantastic building however and is one of fifteen Grade I listed buildings in Manchester.

Make sure to spot the Hanging Bridge, a mediaeval bridge built in 1421, which now can be seen in the Cathedral Visitor Centre. Entry to the Cathedral is free (with a suggested donation of £3), but make sure to check the website to allow for pandemic-related changes to the opening times. Free guided tours are usually available between 10 am and 4 pm from Monday to Saturday, and larger groups can book a chargeable tour by contacting the Cathedral by email.

Palace Theatre

While you are in Manchester, treat yourself to a performance at the fantastic Palace Theatre, one of Manchester’s main theatres.

It has been operating since 1891 and has been refurbished several times throughout its history, resulting in a fantastic theatre, beautiful interior and a large stage, with a capacity of almost 2,000 people. It is one of the largest and best-equipped theatres outside of London and hosts a wide variety of performances including musicals, opera, ballet and comedy shows.

You can find out which plays are being put on here and there are bound to be some fantastic shows at this theatre, as high profile shows seen in the West End will often also be performed here.

Many shows have matinee performances if you would like to visit at a quieter time, and there is street level access for ease of access, as well as wheelchair spaces in the circle seats. If you would like to sit in the stalls, there are 15 steps to go down with no lift access.

Heaton Park

Finally, if you fancy getting out into the fresh air, Heaton Park is a beautiful 600-acre area in Manchester.

There is plenty to do here, including both sightseeing and fun activities. Heaton Park boasts a boating lake, driving range, an observatory, tram museum, animal farm and more!

Alternatively, you can stroll around and take in the nature, architecture and wildlife at your own pace. The park includes the grounds of the beautiful Heaton Hall, an 18th century Grade I listed country house which is occasionally open for the public to look around.

Concerts and open-air theatre performances are also often performed in the park, so make sure to check out what’s on here!

There is ample parking, and you can also get here by public transport, with MetroLink offering Park and Ride tram journeys to the park.

We hope you enjoyed our list of activities for elderly people to do in Manchester. It’s certainly an interesting place, with lots to explore.

Find a Care Home in Manchester

If you are looking for a care home, you can use Lottie to find the best care homes in the Manchester area for yourself or for your loved one. You can see our care homes in Manchester here.

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